ESR 10: In vivo and in vitro characterisation of molecular pathways critical in CKD

Supervisor: Dorien Peters

PhD Student: Cesare Marino

Short Summary

Polycystic Kidney Disease is progressive inherited kidney disease characterised by the formation of many fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys. The number and size of cysts increase over time, finally causing renal failure. The main focus of our research is to unravel the disease mechanism with the aim to develop therapies. To this aim mouse models, cell lines and organoids are being used with (tissue-specific) disruption of the gene involved. In the current project, we will identify and functionally characterise critical molecular pathways involved in cystic tissues, with the goal to identify key molecules involved in progressive cyst formation. You will apply molecular-biological techniques combined with (single cell) sequencing, bioinformatics, cell biology, microscopic analyses and animal studies.

Scientific strategy

Objectives:

Polycystic Kidney Disease is progressive inherited kidney disease characterised by the formation of many fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys. The number and size of cysts increase over time, finally causing renal failure. The main focus of our research is to unravel the disease mechanism with the aim to develop therapies. To this aim mouse models, cell lines and organoids are being used with (tissue-specific) disruption of the gene involved. In the current project, we will identify and functionally characterise critical molecular pathways involved in cystic tissues, with the goal to identify key molecules involved in progressive cyst formation. You will apply molecular-biological techniques combined with (single cell) sequencing, bioinformatics, cell biology, microscopic analyses and animal studies.

Expected Results:

  1. Validation of common and overlapping pathways in different CKD- models;
  2. Insight into the early and late effects of drug treatments on the expression of (target) genes;
  3. Insight into the contribution of different cell types to disease progression.